ARMSTRONG WHITWORTH AVIATION

ARGOSY



Civil Aircraft

The 100 series aircraft were delivered to Riddle Airlines as 101s and to BEA as 102s. Six 200 series aircraft went to BEA and were designated 222s. The first one of this series was designated 200 and was kept by Hawker Siddeley Aviation, presumably for development flying. 100 series had construction numbers 6651-6660 inc. 200 series were 6799-6805 inc.

6651 | 6652 | 6653 | 6654 | 6655 | 6656 | 6657 | 6658 | 6659 | 6660
6799 | 6800 | 6801 | 6802 | 6803 | 6804 | 6805

RAF Argosies on Civil Lists

100 Series

c/n 6651 G-AOZZ
8th of January 1959 first flight, which was flown by Eric Franklin.
12th of December 1961 delivered to BEA.
28th of December 1965 returned to the maker as G-11-1.
7th of December 1968 to Universal Airlines as N896U.
"1969 placed in storage in Marana, AZ.
1971 leased to Duncan Aviation, NB for Alaska BLM work.
1972 bought by Duncan Aviation, NB.
Dec 1991 donated to the YAM by Robert Duncan after usage for 20 years, and flown into Willow Run on December 29 on her last flight." QUOTE
Was at Yankee Air Museum, Willow Run, Michigan.
Scrapped 2013 see Remaining Aircraft

6651 G-AOZZ Heathrow 7 July 63

c/n 6652 Series 101 G-APRL
14th of March 1959 first flight.
It was used at one point to test the beaver tail design of the AW660 before being returned to AW650 configuration.
24th of August 1961 to Riddle Airlines as N6507R.
October 1962 to Capitol Airlines.
30th of July 1964 to Zantop as N602Z.
January 1967 Universal Airlines as N890U.
Returned to the UK with Shackelton Aviation to be operated by Sagittair and/or Field Aviation Sales.
11th of September 1973 to Air Bridge Carriers on the closure of Sagittair.
It is also reported to have been operated by Air Anglia and Otrang Range Air Services, but I have no dates for these.
Its last operator was Field Aviation Sale who operated it on behalf of Elan Parcel Service and is now on show at the Midland Air Museum, Coventry, UK in Elan livery.

G-APRL

c/n 6653 G-APRM
26th of April 1959 first flight, it was a part of the flight test programme together with c/n 6651 & c/n 6652.
29th of November 1961 to BEA.
17th of July 1966 returned to the maker as part exchange for 200 series aircraft.
11th of April 1969 to Rolls Royce Ltd, used to transport engines for Concorde and other duties. It was observed in this role at East Midlands Airport on the 27th of September 1976.
24th of March 1982 to Field Aircraft Services and some time later scraped for spares.

G-APRM
Air-Britain Photographic Images Collection

c/n 6654 G-APRN
13th of May 1959 first flight.
6th of November 1961 delivered to BEA.
3rd of May 1965 returned to the makers and registered as G-11-1 as part of the exchange for series 200 aircraft.
11th of January 1969 went Universal Airlines as N897U.
It later went to Nittler Air Transport.
13th of June 1971 returned to the UK to be operated by Sagittair as G-APRN at East Midlands Airport, Derby UK.
January 1973 to Air Bridge Carriers still as G-APRN.
17th of April 1982 damaged beyond repair, when the right main gear collapsed on landing at Belfast, Northern Ireland. The probable cause was the loss of a pivot pin from the anti-torque assembly. At some time during its time with Air Bridge Carriers it was used by the BAC Jaguar support project.
Accident description from Aviation Safety Network

G-APRN

c/n 6655 G-APVH
20th of July 1959 first flight.
22nd of June 1961 to Riddle Airlines on the as N6504R.
1st of July 1962 to Capitol Airlines.
1st of July 1964 to Zantop Air Transport.
January 1967 to Universal Airlines as N891U.
10th of January 1972 to Duncan Aviation.
19th of May 1974 operated by Duncan Aviation on behalf of the United States Department of Interior as N891U, crashed and was written-off. Take-off from Runway 20 at Anchorage Alaska USA was aborted because the aircraft was unable to get airborne. The aircraft overran by 630 meters and ended up in a wooded area, caught fire and was destroyed. The probable cause was an attempted take-off with the external gust locks installed on the elevators.
Accident description from Aviation Safety Network

G-APVH
Air-Britain Photographic Images Collection

c/n 6656 G-APWW G-1-3
First flew 21 September 1959.
24th of January 1961 to Riddle Airlines as N6503R, but another shows it was registered to them in June 1961.
1st of July 1962 to Capitol Airlines.
1st of July 1965 to Zantop Air Transport.
January 1967 to Universal Airlines as N892U.
15th of January 1972 returned to the UK to be operated by Sagittair as G-APWW.
27th of November 1972 to Air Bridge Carriers.
30th of May 1974 entered the Australian register as VH-BBA, operated by, Brain and Brown Airfreighters.
1977 moved to IPEC Aviation.
14th of July 1980 exported to the USA as N37807, operated by Kris Air and Air Tenggara.
24th of June 1983 returned to the Australian register as VH-IPD and operated by IPEC Aviation.
5th of December 1990 struck off the Australian register and broken up at Essendon Airport, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia for scrap.

More history and photos from Aussie Airliners

VH-IPD

c/n 6657 G-1-4
20th of February 1961 first flight.
11th of June 1961 to Riddle Airlines as N6505R.
1st of July 1962 to Capitol Airlines.
March 1963 to Zantop Air Transport as N600Z.
January 1967 to Universal Airlines as N893U.
28th of August returned to the UK and registered G-AZHN to be operated by Sagittair.
23rd of February 1973 to Air Bridge Carriers with the closure of Sagittair.
At some time it was operated by Air Anglia.
23rd of May 1977 scrapped.

6657 N893U East Midlands Airport Sept 71

c/n 6658 G-1-5
26th of June 1961 first flight.
17th of July 1961 to Riddle Airlines as N6506R.
1st of July 1961 to Capitol Airlines, however one record makes no mention of this but shows it returned as G-1-5 to Armstrong Whitworth Aircraft.
1st of September 1965 to Zantop Air Transport.
In January 1967 to Universal Airlines as N894U.
December 1971 to Management Jets Inc.
1st of February 1972 to Duncan Aviation.
8th of July 1974 crashed and was damaged beyond repair, on landing at Point Hope, Alaska. At some time it was used as a residence in the small town of Point Hope.
Accident description from Aviation Safety Network

c/n 6659 G-1-6
19th of November 1960 first flight, 11th of February 1960 (sic) to Riddle Airlines as N6501R.
1st of June 1962 to Capitol Airlines.
20th of March 1963 (possily March '62) to Zantop Air Transport as N601Z.
14th of October 1965 crashed and was damaged beyond repair. It was on a Logair flight from Madison-Truax Field to Patterson AFB (Air Force Base). On descent all engines lost power as a result of fuel exhaustion and the aircraft made a emergency landing on Interstate 75, 2 miles south of Piqua Ohio USA, where it hit a highway pylon and an automobile. The pilot in command was Robert (Bob) Cupal, the First Officer was Peter Onieu and the Flight Engineer was Robert Butler. The official report states that the probable cause was "Fuel exhaustion caused by failure of the crew to compute and maintain an accurate fuel record" however one of my correspondents states that it was due to a major foul up with the fuelers.
Local newspapers, the Dayton Journal Herald and the Dayton Daily News, both dated 15th October 1965 reported the crash in some detail.
The aircraft made a dead stick landing at about 17.40 local time on the north bound lane of Interstate 75 just short of the Piqua-Troy Pike overpass. It passed under the overpass shearing the port wing off just outboard of the outer engine and the starboard wing just outboard of the inner engine. The aircraft came to rest perpendicular to the road about 1200 feet beyond the over-pas with debris scattered over both lanes of the highway. There was a small fire which was quickly extinguished by the Troy Fire Department.
A car driven by Miss Betty Kaufman, who with her companion Janet Tolle were on route to Indian Lake for a long weekend had a narrow escape. They entered the overpass just ahead of the aircraft and when they reached the other side swerved off the road as the aircraft thundered by. A wing mirror was broken off and the car covered in fuel with damage estimated at $200.
Another witness, a Mr. Carr, an insurance adjuster of Dayton Ohio reported that the aircraft flew over him with about 10 to 12 feet clearance . He claimed that the undercarriage was retracted at the time, but this is unlikely as it was down when the aircraft landed. I suspect he did not appreciate the high wing and undercarriage configuration of the aircraft. The newspapers also reported that 2000 gallons of fuel were on the aircraft when it landed, however the total usable fuel of an Argosy was 3500 gallons so I suspect this should have read 2000 pounds, which I estimated would have been the unusable fuel load.
An interesting observation is that the overpass clearance was reported to be about 18 feet. While I do not have an exact dimension, I estimate that the top of the cockpit to be about 16 feet 6 inches above ground level. This would give about 18 inches as the aircraft passed under the overpass, exciting to say the least.
Accident description from Aviation Safety Network

G-1-6 under going fuel dump trials

c/n 6660 G-1-7
16th of December 1960 first flight.
5th of January 1961 to Riddle Airlines as N6502R.
1st of July 1962 to Capitol Airlines.
1st of September 1965 to Zantop Air Transport.
January 1967 to Universal Airlines as N895U.
February 1972 returned to the UK to be operated as G-BEOZ by Sagittair.
3rd of March 1972 to Air Bridge Carriers when Sagittair closed.
1987 to East Midlands Aeropark.

G-BEOZ
Air-Britain Photographic Images Collection

200 Series

c/n 6799 Series 200
The first 200 to fly, which it did on the 11th of April 1964 as G-ASKZ. Owned and operated as a development aircraft by Armstrong Whitworth.
Destroyed 11 Sep 68.



c/n 6800 Series 222
28th of January 1965 to BEA as G-ASXL.
4th of July 1965 destroyed when flying in turbulence and cloud it hit a hill top at 2230 feet and about 35nm from the runway 36 threshold, at Piacenza Airport, Milan, Italy. The aircraft was following the ILS beam and the probable cause was the failure of the aircrew to determine the aircraft's position in bad weather, due to incorrect identification of a navigation beacon. Together with the failure to make full use of the copilot, Ian Bashall, who by coincidence was also the copilot in the other BEA crash, G-ASXP, c/n 6804.
Accident description from Aviation Safety Network

c/n 6801 Series 222
First flew 10 February 1965.
1st of March 1965 to BEA as G-ASXM.
20th of June 1970 to Transair as CF-TAG.
3rd of November 1971 to Aer Turas as EI-AVJ but was found unsuitable for their operations.
November 1972 returned to Transair as CF-TAG.
27th of October 1973 joined the New Zealand register as ZK-SAF and operated by Safe Air, named Merchant Pioneer.
1st of April 1990 damaged at Woodburne near Blenheim, New Zealand and did not fly again. Now undergoing restoration.
Accident description from Aviation Safety Network

6801, G-ASXM, BEA, 1968

c/n 6802 Series 222
First flew 10 March 1965.
26th of March 1965 to BEA as G-ASXN.
27th of July 1970 to Transair as CF-TAJ.
27th of June 1974 joined the New Zealand register as ZK-SAE and operated by Safe Air, named Merchant Enterprise.
3rd of October 1990 struck off register and withdrawn from use.
It now in the care of The Argosy Trust, PO Box 38, RENWICK 7243, Marlborough, New Zealand.

G-ASXN
Air-Britain Photographic Images Collection

c/n 6803 Series 222
28th of April 1965 to BEA as G-ASXO.
4th of April 1970 to Transair as CF-TAX.
November 1976 it went to SOACO as TR-LWQ.
9th of March 1979 joined the Australian register as VH-IPA and operated by IPEC Aviation.
5th of December 1990 struck off the Australian register and broken up at Essendon Airport, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

More history and photos from Aussie Airliners

6803, G-ASXO, BEA, April 1965

c/n 6804 Series 222
16th of June 1965 to BEA as G-ASXP.
4th of December 1967 destroyed in a training exercise at Stansted Airport UK. The aircraft attempted a takeoff with a simulated No.4 engine failure, it went out of control, cart wheeled on its starboard wing and caught fire. The probable cause of the loss of control was the No.4 propeller going into ground fine pitch when the engine was throttled back. As mentioned before, the co-pilot was Ian Bashall, who was the co-pilot on the other BEA aircraft to crash, G-ASXL, c/n 6800.
Accident description from Aviation Safety Network

c/n 6805 Series 222
21st of November 1966 to BEA as G-ATTC to replace G-ASXL.
6th of May 1970 to Transair as CF-TAZ.
September 1976 to SOACO as TR-LWR.
1st of September 1978 joined the Australian register as VH-IPB and operated by IPEC Aviation.
2nd of May 1990 exported to New Zealand.
8th of May 1990 registered as ZK-SAL and operated by SAFE AIR.
26th of September 1990 returned to Australia.
2nd of November 1990 restored to the Australian register as VH-IPB and operated by IPEC Aviation.
5th of December 1990 struck off the Australian register and broken up at Essendon Airport, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
There is a report that this aircraft narrowly escaped a disaster en route from Milan, when the outer starboard engine (No.4) suffered a reduction gear failure, which resulted in the propeller detaching and, in doing so, destroyed number 3 engines. Part of one of the propellers then severely damaged the side of the fuselage. Despite this major damage the captain managed to make a safe landing at Le Bourget airport, Paris France. I have not seen the official report but presume it was repaired and continued to fly.

More history and photos from Aussie Airliners

G-ATTC


6767 XP412 G-BDCV

XP412 as G-ABDCV
Air-Britain Photographic Images Collection

6778 XP446 9Q-COE

XP446 as 9Q-COE carrying 70 Sqn fin markings, East Midlands Airport, 18 September 1977

6779 XP447 N1430Z

N1430Z - XP447 Ex 70 Sqn.RAF Kemble MAR 76

6782 XP450 RP- C1192

RP-C1192 (cn 6782) XP450 East Midlands '70s
Picture Source

6791 XR136 9Q-COA

9Q-COA - XR136 EMA 18 SEP 77

6798 XR143 G-BFVT

G-BFVT formerly XR143 at Lincoln Nebraska 7 Aug 93
Air-Britain Photographic Images Collection



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